The Walking Dead Season 7, Episode 13 ‘Bury Me Here’ Review: The Melon Flipped the Switch

Over the previous episodes involving the Kingdom, it has been all about King Ezekiel not wanting to go to war, Carol’s self-isolation, Morgan’s fascism, and Richard’s failing attempts to convince the King to let the Kingdom fight. All of those things change in this episode when a hidden melon starts a chain of events that would hopefully help our heroes’ cause against the Saviors.

I thought the last time that I was going to shed a tear for this season of The Walking Dead was during its premiere where we lost Abraham and Glenn, but as I watched ‘Bury Me Here,’ I was slowly realizing that there were more tears to shed.

As the title suggests, ‘Bury Me Here’ will feature somebody getting buried. Who is it and how is that death going to affect the mentality of those involved? Grab a tissue as you read on because this is going to be one of those unexpectedly emotional episodes.

The Final Moments of Peace

Carol was told that everything and everyone at Alexandria is okay by Daryl, but being the intelligent woman that she is, it must have been one of those curious thoughts that just hit her out of nowhere – Why were Rick and co. brought to the Kingdom in the first place if everything is okay? With that thought bothering her mind, she decided to finally rise from her solitude and ask Morgan about what really happened.

Now, you can’t blame Morgan for refusing to tell her what really happened because he knows that Carol doesn’t want to get involved anymore, and so he tells her to go to Alexandria herself to find out. He even offered to go with her, but she declined, failed to find the enlightenment that she needed, and leaves.

It’s easier to understand Morgan’s reasoning for not telling her because from a viewer’s standpoint, he was still holding on to something at this point of the episode, something that he will lose later on. I don’t really understand Carol because when Morgan said that she should go to Alexandria to know what is happening, she should have known that there was something wrong. It makes me ask the question if this was just denying herself from the painful truth that some of her friends died because she also wants to hold on to something inside of her. As she mentioned previously, there will be nothing left inside of her if she kills more people.

Morgan obviously loves the way of life at the Kingdom. He is all for the deal that they have with the Saviors, of course, because that way, he knows that nobody’s going to die, and that satisfies his fascism.

In the episode, despite the short amount of time he has spent there, it seems like Morgan has started to become really close with Benjamin and Henry, and I can only bet that he sees his son Duane in them that he would lose it if one of them dies. Too soon?

The Ballad of the Missing Melon

The episode opened with the Kingdommers loading up one melon at the back of the truck. It doesn’t make sense at first as to why they’re loading up a single melon, and why they’re all sad but It was that single melon that caused the death of two people.

Over the previous episodes, as I have just mentioned, Richard has failed to convince King Ezekiel to fight the Saviors, and in this episode, we see his plan unfold before our eyes not knowing what the consequences would be.

Richard was willing to sacrifice his own life for the greater good of the group. He wrote his note, dug his grave, and had a really elaborate plan to sabotage the Kingdom’s drop for the Saviors so that it would enrage them and kill him. However, Richard may have forgotten that they’re dealing with the Saviors, a very unpredictable group who would kill anyone by random selection. His brilliant plan was proven stupid when things go differently at the supply drop.

The Kingdom was supposed to deliver 12 melons to the Saviors, but there were only 11. That’s the one melon at the beginning of the episode that Richard hid to enrage the Saviors thinking that they will kill him in the process. His plan backfired – not only were their guns taken, Jared, the Savior who took Morgan’s stick, decided that he didn’t want to kill Richard so he shoot Benjamin in the leg instead.

Drastic Changes

Benjamin’s femoral artery ruptured when he was shot. Carol tried to save him, but it was too late as Benjamin bled to death.

I really appreciate Benjamin as a character, and I was really hoping that we would see more of him. In this case, however, he was used as a plot device to really push the characters to their limit.

It is evident that Benjamin’s death has pushed Morgan to his limit. The Morgan we met in ‘Clear’ is back. Morgan the fascist? He’s gone! He burst out of that door to try to find out how things went wrong, and it wasn’t long before he pieced everything together.

Richard explained that he needed to sabotage the supply drop to cause an event that would get Ezekiel to want to fight, we all know he was ready to get himself killed, but the unexpected resulted in Benjamin’s death. Richard still got his death wish when Morgan strangled him to death in front of the Saviors and tells them about what Richard told him to make them think that everything is still okay between the Kingdom and the Saviors. Richard got he wanted, although he wasn’t being considerate of else would be affected, the Kingdom are going to war inevitably.

I wouldn’t be the first one saying this as a fan, but I feel like Morgan was misused from the time he returned, and now, I feel like they’re finally using the character to his full potential. I also want to praise Lennie James’ performance as Morgan, we haven’t seen a performance like that from the show lately, so that was refreshing to watch.

Carol was packing her bags to go to Alexandria when Morgan finally told her what happened. Instead of going to the Alexandria, she decided to go to the Kingdom instead to convince King Ezekiel to fight. As we have all witnessed, he didn’t really need a lot of convincing because he now knows that they have to. Carol’s solitude? King Ezekiel not wanting to go to war? Richard’s failed attempt to have the Kingdom go to war with the Saviors? That all changed now thanks to a single melon.

It is noteworthy that Melissa McBride was blessed and at the same time burdened with the heavy drama of the show. The critics will definitely be keeping an eye out for her future performances. The great thing about Melissa McBride is she always knows how to deliver that it’s difficult to find a really reasonable flaw with her performance based on the material she was given.

Episode Rating

The second half of The Walking Dead is sort of fluctuating when It comes to producing great episodes. Following a not so great episode last week, ‘Bury Me Here’ managed to hype up the fans for the inevitable war that the communities are going to have with the Saviors. I also loved the fact that it was a single melon that completely flipped the switch, we can’t deny the fact that is still Richard’s fault of course, but it was nice to see the characters really change how they look at things because of the death of Benjamin.

The episode was a little slow, and although some moments were a little off, it had a lot of highs that would make anybody watching really stand up and cheer for what’s about to come. With the unexpectedly emotional impact and the adrenaline that comes along with it, I think ‘Bury Me Here’ deserves an 8.5 out of 10. In my opinion, it is one of the greatest episodes of the season.

Trouble at the Hilltop Colony

On the next episode of The Walking Dead, “the Saviors visit the Hilltop unexpectedly, surprising everyone, with plans of taking more than supplies.” In the promo, we see Daryl and Maggie seemingly running away to hide from the Saviors who visited the Hilltop, and it is revealed that Sasha and Rosita pushed through with their mission.

You can watch the promo The Walking Dead season 7, episode 14, “The Other Side” below:

What do you think about this week’s episode of The Walking Dead? Sound in the comments below!

Header Image: AMC

 

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