An Adult’s Guide to being Young

Age is just a number, but some people grow old, and they just become, well, old. When we were kids, the way we enjoy things is, of course, entirely different. There are some traits that stick, but as we grow older, the way we perceive and do things also change. This is a simple guide for adults on how to deal with things without making adulthood feel like a burden.

Imagination > Knowledge

As an adult, I used to think that a lot of kids are dumb, but I am dumber for thinking that way. I have been through that kind of thought process, so I should be understanding of what I thought was dumb.

Growing up, I feel like a lot of people let go of their imagination as they start to think that knowledge is far greater. They would argue that imagination could only leave you to imagining a paycheck, as knowledge could actually give you one. That is true, but I think it’s still important to have imagination, and just because it is labeled as something that “you can only imagine,” does not mean it’s impossible.

Albert Einstein once said: “Knowledge is limited. Imagination encircles the world.” Based on that alone, I will say that imagination is way more important than knowledge. You can draw a lot from imagination, the thought process when you use imagination is more free-flowing, and your ideas are more elevated with it.

Stop Planning

I have noticed that a lot of adults like to plan things because it would make a lot of things easier for them. But who wants easy when you could be spontaneous and have more fun?

I used to write down my plans, and always do my best to follow them. The guilt that it makes you feel whenever you couldn’t follow through with a plan is just so heavy that sometimes, it discourages you from planning anything in the future. When we were younger, we just go with the flow, but still have a good time, so I figured that trying that as an adult, not planning things might help me let go of the predictability.

You feel obliged to do something with plans, and obligation seems like such an adult thing so you just go with it, and come up with a lame excuse when you can’t. When that kind of feeling weighs you down, anything you do is going to start to feel draggy that it’s going to take away all the fun. Between all the planned trips you have had with your friends and the unplanned ones, you have more fun when you’re spontaneous.

Play More

While being playful sticks to a lot of people, a lot of adults grow out of it. There’s nothing wrong with being playful if it’s in the right place. Stop being such a bore.

Be Awesomely Wholesome

We like to complain, and adults like to complain about how dreadful their job is yet they continue to be enslaved by it. It is true that not everyone can afford to take a break, but why sacrifice your health?

You work hard to provide a healthy lifestyle for yourself, but if you come to think of it, you’re just sacrificing your health. You become stressed when you overwork yourself, and when you’re stressed, you become sick, and when you’re sick, there’s a chance that you’ll die.

It’s difficult to get a job that’s stress-free, I get that. But wealth is nothing without health. It is important to balance work and me-time. Go back to the days when you were doing your homework, it wasn’t much of a priority.

I know the responsibilities of adulthood, and as much as I would like to think of it as a myth, it is reality. A lot of us like to make things seem more difficult than it is, and I think it’s up to us to make the most out of it without looking at it as if it’s a burden.


Every Wednesday, I’ll be posting essays about life. Got any questions? Click here.

Header Image: Original Image from InfoSearchers

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One thought on “An Adult’s Guide to being Young

  1. This is great! More adults need to have fun with life and not be so serious. I always told myself I didn’t want to act like an adult. My life isn’t all about some job; it’s about having fun and enjoying the adventure^^

    Liked by 1 person

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